S20

Biography

Hiroaki Umeda is a choreographer and a multidisciplinary artist now recognized as one of the leading figures of the Japanese avant-garde art scene. Since the launch of his company S20, his subtle yet violent dance pieces have toured around the world to audience and critical acclaim. His work is acknowledged for the highly holistic artistic methodology with strong digital back ground, which considers not only physical elements as dance, but also optical, sonal, sensorial and, above all, spatiotemporal components as part and parcel of the choreography. Based on his profound interest in choreographing time and space, Umeda has spread his talent not only as a choreographer and dancer, but also as a composer, lighting designer, scenographer and visual artist.

Born in Tokyo, 1977, Umeda first studied photography at the Nihon University in Tokyo. At the age of 20, he gained interest in art more suitable for creating intense bodily experiences, which he is now known for, and started taking numerous dance classes such as ballet, hip-hop, modern dance and so on. After around a year, in 2000, Umeda stopped attending the lessons, founded his company, S20, and started creating his own multidisciplinary works by freely integrating all distinct dance practices and other art forms. In 2002, his ever-popular work while going to a condition received great acclaim at Yokohama Dance Collection R (Yokohama, Japan) and was immediately invited to Rencontres Choréographiques Internationales (Paris). Director Anita Mathieu hailed the piece as ‘a visual and sensorial experience [...] The discovery of a young artist, both original and promising.’

In 2007, his new solo piece Accumulated Layout premiered in the prestigious Théâtre National de Chaillot with much anticipation, which resulted in a sell-out performance and another great acclaim. Drawing further from his now signature style of mixing digital imagery, minimal soundscape and extremely potent corporeality, Umeda’s other solo works such as Adapting for Distortion (2009), Haptic (2009), Holistic Strata (2011) and split flow (2013) has transfixed the audience in major festivals and theatres worldwide such as Festival d’Automne (Paris), Pompidou Centre (Paris), Biennale de la Danse (Lyon), Kunstenfestivaldesarts (Brussel), Festival Roma Europa (Rome), Tanz im August (Berlin), Tanzquartier (Vienna), NY Live Art (New York), The Barbican Center (London), Sydney Opera House (Sydney), National Chiang Kai-Shek Cultural Center, R.O.C (Taipei) and Aichi Triennale (Aichi). One of his most successful pieces, Holistic Strata, co-produced by the Yamaguchi Center for Arts and Media (Yamaguchi), which Umeda calls as a ‘kinetic installation’ has seamlessly assimilated the boundary between dance and visual art. Later it was praised by Le Monde as, not an one-man show, but as an ‘one man dancing landscape.’

In 2009, Umeda commenced his ten-year choreographic project ‘Superkinesis’ and started working with dancers of distinct physical background such as contemporary dancers (1.centrifugal, 2009), hip-hop dancers (2. repulsion, 2010), classical ballet dancers (3. isolation, 2011) and Asian traditional dancers (4. temporal pattern, 2013). From the outset, Umeda’s minimal and innovative choreography style which harmonizes his singular physical language and the different dancers’ bodies has gained great attention and most pieces have been commissioned by important organizations such as Théâtre de Suresnes Jean Vilar (2. repulsion), Hebbel am Ufer (3. isolation) and Esplanade Theatre, National Chian Kai-Shek Cultural Center, R.O.C and Aichi Triennale (4, temporal pattern), In ‘Superkinesis,’ Umeda ventures to discover kinetic movements innate to human beings, preceding the construction of cosmetic choreographic language, and subsequently attempts to develop a transcendental (super) order in the space and time of the stage per se. In this series of choreographic experiment, Umeda considers dancers’ bodies as natural objects constantly affected by the natural force, and explores to discover kinetic languages by tuning into the subtle voices of the surrounding environment that only could be perceived by an acute sensorial receptor called dancers.

GötenborgsOperans Danskompani, Sweden has commissioned Umeda’s latest choreography piece, Interfacial Scale (2013), created for 11 dancers and an abstract orchestral music composed by Yoshihiro Hannno. Fresh from the show’s success, his next choreographic piece, due to be premiered at Théâtre Châtelet in March 2014, is commissioned by the L.A Dance Project lead by Benjamin Millepied.

Extending from his interest in providing an unknown sensorial experience to the audience, from 2010, Umeda has been working on series of installations which mainly focus on optical illusion and physical immersion. The main works include Haptic (installation) (2010) commissioned by Aichi Triennale, Holistic Strata (installation) (2011) premiered at Exposition EXIT at Maison des arts de Créteil, and split flow (installation) (2012) commissioned by the Van Abbenmuseum of Eindhoven. His string of works combining visual and physical sensation has earned him Prix Ars Electronica, Honorary Mention, in 2010.



梅田宏明(うめだ・ひろあき) 振付家、ダンサー、ビジュアル・アーティスト。2000年に、カンパニー「S20」設立。以後、そのテクノロジーを駆使しながらも身体強度の高い作品が評価され、欧州、北米、南米、アジア、中東、アフリカ、オーストラリアの各都市で公演する。視覚芸術と身体芸術の境界を越えるそのダンス作品は、デジタル・アートからの強い影響と共に創作へのホリスティック(全体的)なアプローチに特徴があり、身体のみならず、光、音、映像、そしてなにより時間と空間を振付可能な一要素として捉えている。「時間と空間を振付ける」というクリエイションの可能性を追究し、現在では振付家・ダンサーとしてだけでなく、作曲家、照明デザイナー、舞台美術家、ビジュアル・アーティストとしても活動の裾野を広げている。

1977年、東京都まれ。高校卒業後、日本大学芸術学部写真学科に入学。在学中、写真より鑑賞者に身体的な経験を与えられる方法論に興味が移り、20歳のときにバレエ、ヒップホップ、モダンダンスなどのダンスレッスンを受け始める。約1年後、すべてのレッスンを中断し、カンパニー「S20」設立。特定のジャンルに束縛されることなく、多様なダンスメソッドと他の芸術分野を自在に統合する、独自のマルチ・ディシプリナリー(分野横断的)な表現方法を開拓しはじめる。2002年、横浜ダンスコレクションRで発表した『while going to a condition』が高く評価され、フランスのRencontres Choréographiques Internationalesに招聘される。ディレクターのアニタ・マチュー氏に「視覚的で、知覚的な経験。独創的で将来性のある若いアーティストの誕生」 と称賛される。

2007年、パリのシャイヨー国立劇場でソロ新作『Accumulated Layout』を連日満員の観客に上演し、さらに評価を高める。以後、梅田のシグネチャー・スタイルとして認知されるようになる、デジタル・イメージ、ミニマル・サウンドスケープ、そして極めて雄弁な身体を美しく統合するソロ新作群——『Adapting for Distortion』(2009年)、『Haptic』(2009年)、『Holistic Strata』(2011年)、『split flow』(2013年)——が、旧作と共に定期的に世界の主要フェスティバルや主要劇場に招聘されるようになる。主な会場に、Festival d’Automne(パリ)、Centre Pompidou(パリ)、Biennale de la Danse(リヨン)、Kunstenfestivaldesarts(ブリュッセル)、Festival Romaeuropa(ローマ)、Tanz im August(ベルリン)、Tanzquartier Wien(ウィーン)、New York Live Arts(ニューヨーク)、Barbican Centre(ロンドン)、Sydney Opera House(シドニー)、National Chian Kai-shek Cultural Center, R.O.C.(台北)、あいちトリエンナーレ(名古屋)など。山口情報芸術センターと共同制作された近年の代表作のひとつ『Holistic Strata』は、ダンス作品としてよりも「キネティック・インスタレーション」として創作され、そのダンスとビジュアル・アートが見事に融合された舞台を、仏ル・モンド紙はワンマン・ショーならず「ワンマン・ランドスケープ」と称賛した。

2009年、10年計画となる振付プロジェクト「Superkinesis」を開始。コンテンポラリー・ダンサー(1. centrifugal、2009年)、ヒップホップ・ダンサー(2. repulsion、2010年)、クラシックバレエ・ダンサー(3. isolation、2011年)、アジア伝統舞踊ダンサー(4. temporal pattern、2013年)など、異なる文化的背景を持つダンサーたちとの共同創作をはじめる。本プロジェクト開始直後から、梅田の鋭い身体感覚とダンサーの肉体を調和させる革新的な振付スタイルが広く注目を集め、多くが国際的な劇場からの委託作品として制作される。一例にThéâtre de Suresnes Jean Vilar(2. repulsion)、Hebbel am Ufer(HAU)(3. isolation)、Esplanade – Theatres on the Bay、Chiang Kai-shek Cultural Center, R.O.C、あいちトリエンナーレ(4. temporal pattern)などがあげられる。Superkinesisとは、舞踊化される以前の運動言語(kinesis)を探求し、そこからの超越的(Super)な空間秩序の構築を目指す概念である。また梅田はこの一連の振付作品を通して、ダンサーの身体を「自然力に影響される自然物」として捉えている。そしてダンサーの身体を極めて繊細な感覚受容器として用いることで、自然環境に潜在的にある潤沢な情報を受信し、つまりは環境への身体の調和から、独自の運動言語を構築しようと試みている。

最新の委託振付作品『Interfacial Scale』(2013年)は、コンテンポラリー・バレエ界の国際的名門ゴッテンブルグ・オペラ・ダンスカンパニーのために制作された。本作は、映画・ミニマルテクノなど幅広い分野で活躍する作曲家・半野喜弘氏に音楽を依頼し、11人のダンサーとオーケストラのための作家初の大規模作品として上演された。また2014年3月には、次期パリ・オペラ座バレエ団芸術監督に任命されたベンジャミン・ミルピエ率いるL.A Dance Project のための委託振付作品をシャトレ劇場(パリ)で発表する。

「観客に未知の身体感覚を与えたい」という作家の意図に端を発して、2010年頃からは、錯視と身体的没入感覚にフォーカスしたインスタレーション作品を発表しはじめる。主な作品に、 あいちトリエンナーレにより委託された『Haptic (installation)』(2010年)、パリのMaison des arts de Créteil Exposition EXITで初展示された『Holistic Strata (installation)』(2011年)、オランダ、アインドホーヴェンのVan Abbenmuseumにより委託された『split flow (installation)』(2012年)などがある。これら身体感覚を揺さぶるビジュアル・アートの数々と、ジャンル越境的な振付作品により、2010年には国際的メディアアートの祭典アルス エレクトロニカ(リンツ)のデジタルミュージック/サウンドアート部門で入賞する。

 

Artist’s Thoughts



Composing Holistic Sensations: Artist’s Thoughts by Hiroaki Umeda


1. Creative Principles

When the world is analyzed through the lens of Hiroaki Umeda, it is possible to assume that the whole of this universe is entirely virtual. When our eyes receive the light signals abound in the external world, it is firstly transmitted to the brain, then processed into units of information, and finally reach cognition by matching it with an existing linguistic code. However, obviously, all through this procedure, there are no tangible objects to which we can point at and suggest it as reality. In our everyday life, humans assemble plethora of informative signals into manageable units and recognize them, for instance, as an individual, an object, or a certain scenery. Yet, according to Umeda, what hypostatizes these batches of abstract information is merely our ‘belief system’: ‘When one has confidence on object’s facticity they name it real, and when this confidence is slightly undermined they rename it as virtual.’ At the end of the day, however, when every sight is optically dissolved into molecules, both reality and virtuality are simply consisted of particles of light.

Information flow in breakneck speed and the society shifts in light-footed rhythm in a megalopolis such as Tokyo; and together with this incessant stream of transformation the given value system in society rapidly comes and goes. Growing up in this liquid milieu, it was inevitable for Umeda to lay the groundwork for his belief system by resorting not to language nor to history, but to his own substantive body. For Umeda, the body ‘is a place pregnant with language preceding language, and emotion prior to emotion.’ In other words, it is a place where ‘archetypes of signs exist’: where languages and emotions are still in its totality avoiding the distortion from society. Umeda highly respect the value of this primitive yet complex sensations in the body which emerges from multifarious external interactions, and abstain from easily processing them through the empirical encoding system called language. Umeda calls this pre-linguistic and pre-emotional entity as the ‘Impulse,’ and by observing, analyzing, and theorizing it thoroughly, he situates it at the basis of his artist creation.

‘Impulse’ is considered as the seed and also the goal of his creation. Based on the various physical stimulations that are stocked inside his body, Umeda logically composes all stimulants on stage—light, sound, image, body—in order to share his ‘Impulse’ with the audience via the delicately orchestrated performance. ‘I want to provide unknown physical sensations to the audience,’ says Umeda. In other words, through his stage abound will stimuli, he attempts to liberate the audience’s receptor of the senses which has inevitably become dysfunctional in today’s highly regulatory society. For Umeda, this aesthetic (or aísthēsis in Greek, meaning sensation)  experience is the most powerful social validity that art can posses. It is only when we encounter extremely radical and sublime experiences that go beyond the realm of empirical language, that we envision an ideal world that has never been and beget imagination that could change the future.

Now, as previously mentioned, for Umeda, when the world is dissolved into minimum base unit the basic component is merely particles of light; or in some other cases atoms and protons. By the same token, when this microscopic vision is inverted to a macroscopic perspective, it is possible to suggest that all entity on earth—whether humans, artifacts or nature—is constituted of the same material and thus are coherently united as a whole. Put otherwise, in Umeda’s thoughts, ‘man is merely a collective entity of particles, not so different from stones, ants and birds.’ This notion derives from Umeda’s conviction that what is believed to differentiate humans from others, like souls, minds and spirits, are actually intangible objects and, again, cannot substantiate its existence. Moreover, Umeda does not subscribe to the doctrine that individuals are contained within one body. Just like flock of birds could occasionally be recognized as a single unit of life, ‘the demarcation line between the individual and the collective is actually quite obscure.’

Naturally, thereby, the common grammar of individual human beings which supports its superiority to all other life forms and objects becomes a contrived concept. When everything is dissolved into atoms and protons, there are not much difference between humans and objects, and not much certainty between individuality and entirety. And when the world is observed though this newly adopted lens, an ethically more ‘humble world’ constructed from non-hierarchical networks connecting humans, objects and nature emerge. Based on this philosophy, Umeda abandons the hierarchical structure common to stage which readily apply materialistic elements to accommodate the human body.  In Umeda’s pieces, per contra, the fact that humans exist on the equivalent level as all other natural and artificial entities is clearly emphasized. In short, Umeda’s works are conceptually deeply rooted in the philosophy which could be called as ‘post-anthropocentrism.’ Humans, objects and nature coexist with ease, and subsequently from here a holistic spatiotemporal experience filled with physical stimuli is born.



2. Dance Method

By briefly attending distinct dance lessons from ballet to hip-hop, Umeda realized at the outset of his career that, in foundational level, there exist a ‘common denominator for physical movements’ which is adaptable to all dance styles. Thanks to the belated entry into the world of dance at the relevantly mature age of twenty when his conceptual basis was already fixed, Umeda could not blindly obey to the existing dogmatic disciplines which did not accommodate his physicality at all. Moreover, when observed through his eyes, the stylistic differences perceived among distinct dance forms were only like the differences seen in fashion styles: they are different only when analyzed through the scope of established cultural institution. Beneath this cosmetic variance, however, there should exist a pre-dance movement principle transcending all social categorization. Based on this fundamental assumption, Umeda eliminates all unidimensional categorization and pursues to discover the underlying ‘Kinetic Principles’ which, in turn, becomes the constitutive elements of the ‘Movement System’ transcending all styles. This is regarded as the basis of ‘Umeda Method,’ where ‘kinetic movements’ function as the alphabetical component for constructing the physical language called the ‘Movement System’ that transcends the law of stylistic genres.

The practice of Umeda Method could be divided into three stages. First step is ‘standing’ in Neutral Position. According to Umeda, it is essential for the mover to master two kinetic principles to accomplish the postures of standing. That is, the ‘Principle of Balance’ which becomes the basis of movements, and the ‘Principle of Tension and Relaxation’ which generates all movements. In Umeda Method, a perfect balance is achieved by controlling the three gravity points of the body: the center of hips, the center of chest and the effort point of the sole. Umeda claims that, ‘if these three points are in full control, all human standing positions could be accomplished.’ For instance, the so-called Neutral Position is achieved by ‘placing the top of the chest, over the hip, over the center sole, and aligning it in a single grid.’ And when the mover masters the gist of Principle of Balance, he or she will gradually notice the importance of the Principle of Tension and Relaxation. This is because when one stands in the most natural position in tune with the laws of physics, all redundant tension disappears from the body, which, in turn, enables the mover to generate maximum range of motion in minimum amount of input.

The second stage is ‘moving’ in harmony with the natural force. In Umeda Method, all kinetic movements are engendered by adapting the body to the natural forces existing in the environment, such as gravity, repulsion and centrifugal force. In other words, the mover does not apply active movements in order to command the environment, but rather develops passive movements by channeling to the natural force. ‘It’s easy to understand when you imagine the movement of swings,’ says Umeda, ‘since the fulcrum point of a swing is so solid, it naturally creates a beautiful trajectory with minimum input to the moving point, that is, the seat.’ As is demonstrated by this simple principle of dynamics, when the mover once masters the Neutral Position of first stage, they will be able to realize a kinetic movement which ‘embodies the transmission of natural force running through their bodies.’

Lastly, the third stage is to develop a ‘flow’ by applying, again, the surrounding natural force. Umeda Method differs from, for instance, forms of classical ballet since it does not attempt to generate a ‘pose, or pause’ by defying and controlling the gravity, but rather strives to develop a ‘flow’ by falling into chime with the surrounding environment. According to Umeda, in order to create a beautiful ‘flow,’ that is devoid of any redundant noise (such as tension and ego), it is necessary for the movers to temporarily unlock the ‘limiter of the conscious’ regulated by human logic. This is because it is significantly important for the mover ‘to remove all prejudice which readily assumes the limit of human movements.’ When one assumes that humans are capable of taking full control of the body, the movement becomes rigid and thus cannot transcend the existing physical formats. Rather, in order to generate unknown movements, it is important for the mover to once let go of reason and physically communicate with the natural surroundings.

One may wonder if people could actually achieve this state of mind, but this statement is borne out by Umeda’s own kinetic movements which at times seems like an unknown creature, or ‘inhuman in form.’ Humans are by no means hermetic to the environment and the very possibility of innovative movements, transcending existing postulations, starts from communicating attentively with the external world.


3. Choreographic Project ‘Superkinesis’

Superorganism is a concept in biology where a collection of agents, either insects, plants or animals, act in concert to produce a single phenomena governed by the collective. Exemplary case can be seen in, for instance, colony of ants and flock of migrant birds. Inspired by this biological concept, Umeda commenced his ten-year choreographic project ‘Superkinesis’ in 2009. In this project, Umeda attempts ‘to compose all kinetic movements on stage, that is, not only bodies but also, for example, lights, sounds and imageries,’ and by harmonizing all the kinetic movements on a transcendental (super) level, ‘a spatiotemporal artifact that is analogous to a gigantic living organism comes into being.’ And in order to materialize this organism, Umeda basically choreographs all movements on stage.

The underlying reason for the ambition to choreograph all movements lies in Umeda’s conviction that humans are part and parcel of natural order, and by extension, the bodies are just one element constituting the stage. Put differently, the existing dichotomy of nature and artifacts does not chart the world persuasively for him, since Umeda’s theory run counter to it and consider all artifacts as gift of nature. In the line of thinking, the artist claims that the highly civilized animate beings called humans could also be considered as natural objects. Based on this hypothesis, and as previously noted, Umeda suggests that even in an advanced art form like contemporary dance, the mover should not command the environment but should rather obey to the surroundings. It is worth repeating this methodological tenet since this is the underlying philosophy of Superkinesis. ‘When you look at a cat,’ Umeda explains, ‘you could see that the animal has achieved a superbly sophisticated and functional movement by chiming perfectly with the surroundings. In the same manner, I believe, that if people fully harmonize with the environment, a human movement per se should emerge.’ Put otherwise, in Umeda’s thoughts, nature induces animate kineses and the environment precedes human movements. For this reason, it is absolutely natural for the artist to choreograph all elements on stage to create an integral holistic experience.

This choreographic experiment can be divided into three phases. The first phase focuses on the research of ‘kinetic movements.’ By collaborating with dancers from different background—contemporary dancers, hip-hop dancers and ballet dancers—and by adapting Umeda Method to their respective physicality, the choreographer strives to seek a diverse range of kinetic vocabulary that should derive from different experiments.

The second phase is committed to the invention of the ‘system.’ At this stage the choreographer attempts to discover a common ground, or a system, which could be shared by the multiple movers existing on stage. This unity could be achieved by, for example, coordinating the breath, the rhythm, the velocity of movements or the specific parts of movements of the dancers. Put otherwise, the second phase is dedicated to the ‘choreography of time’ which could be shared by distinct movers.

The last phase is devoted to the development of the ‘order.’ On top of the physical system realized by multiple dancers in the previous stage, other choreographic materials such as light, sound and image will be added as the final layer of the craft and the total order of the space will be pursued.

Due to practical reasons, the choreographic research is divided into three phases but experiments of movement, system and order are more or less conducted all though the three-step process. To recapitulate, it is a project which seeks to choreograph all kinetic movements on stage—physical, temporal and spatial shift—in order to materialize an organic whole. As of February 2014, the Superkinesis project has fruitfully progressed to the second phase.


4. Technology and Visual Installations

If all kinetic movements are equal aesthetic components of choreography, then there could be a ‘choreographic piece’ which does not include any human beings. Moreover, if the major objective of the artist lies in providing the audience the pre-linguistic and pre-emotional physical sensation which alternatively could be called as the ‘impulse,’ that experience can be generated possibly without the medium of the moving body. Base on this hypothesis, Umeda started working on visual installations from around 2010.

Needless to say, the direct confrontation of the two bodies—the mover and the spectator—enables a multivalent experience specific to live performances and Umeda also believes in this fecundity of the art form. However, there also exist artistic weaknesses in performing arts and, for Umeda, the most crucial deficit is the interpretive approach, or to borrow the artist’s words, ‘a sluggish experience analogous to linguistic cognizance.’ To explain concretely, when an audience member attends a dance performance, he or she will firstly integrate all the light particles into an image, then will recognize it as a movement of human bodies, and lastly will develop a theoretical concept by processing the piece through a critical framework. Conversely, in installations, ‘we could bypass this sluggish process,’ states Umeda, ‘and directly provide optical and sonal stimuli to the audiences’ bodies.’ In order to make full usage of this immediate impact, Umeda’s cyber installations perplex the vision, challenge the limitations of hearings and undermine the sense of equilibrium of the audience. In short, his digital installations does not allow much time for cerebral processing but rather speaks directly to the viewer’s corporeality. Umeda states that, in the near future, he is considering of exploring haptic and other sensory apparatus for developing an intense artistic experiences.

Many consider Umeda as an interdisciplinary artist who skillfully melded  technology with contemporary dance—and this is not a false assumption. However, according to the artist, deploying technological devices or digital softwares is not a sine qua non for his craft. Moreover, Umeda admits that he is not applying anything thad could be called as the state-of-the-art technology. Then why, in Umeda’s works, exist a technologically up-to-date-quality that is rarely observed in the realm of dance?  The artist answers as follows: ‘Simply, I think it is because my thoughts are updated together with the advancement of technology.’

Umeda does not indicate much interest in ‘reproducing’ the existing reality by using the latest technology. For instance, like regenerating the quasi-real sound of a classic concert through the most-advanced audio equipment run counter to his vision.  If an unprecedented audio device has been developed, Umeda will strive to produce (and not reproduce) a new sound that can only be generated by using that equipment. Similarly, if it is a visual device, he will explore to produce a world which can only be visualized through that high-resolution appliance. To this effect, Umeda believes that the updating of artist’s thoughts should go hand in hand with the updating of technology. For Umeda, the fruitful future of the technology art cannot be made possible only by the development of technology itself but more so by the renewal of the artist’s thoughts triggered by the former’s innovations. Put otherwise, it is not the technology but the artist who envisions and enables the latest artistic work. This is why Umeda does not commence his project unless he foresees the core vision of the project. And once that vision is clarified to a certain extent, he starts searching for minimal technological prescriptions required for achieving the goal.

Digital technologies in Umeda’s dance pieces are adopted in the main for two objectives. First, in order to ‘enhance the resolution of the world.’ When digital technologies are applied, space, for example, can be depicted in the precision of a pixel and time can be commanded by the expansion and compression of the sound beyond the accuracy of human aural ability. ‘I believe,’ Umeda claims, ‘that there exist another dimension of aesthetic world which can only be realized by the finesse of digitally controlled time and space.’ Second, the artist applies digital apparatus for ‘expanding and shrinking the human physical scale.’ An easy example could be seen in the usage of sensors in Holistic Strata (2011). The sensor captures the movement of the body in real time and reflects that on the background screen. Through this procedure, the mover can feel as though the circumference of his physical territory has macroscopically expanded. Or, on the contrary, if bodies are enfolded with infinite fine lines which can only be depicted by precision mechanical equipment, the mover can feel as though the measurement of the physical sphere has microscopically shrunk.

Umeda asserts that, ‘the development of digital technologies is radically changing the human physical perception,’ and indeed it is shifting the conception of ourselves. Some may readily reject this physical transformation as it may jeopardize the given concept of a human body, but for Umeda, who swiftly ‘updates his thoughts together with the advancement of technology,’ this is the de facto standard of the present human physicality. Not only by keeping pace with the up-to-date technology but also adapting ones’s minds and bodies to this technologically-enhanced environment, Umeda creates an artwork that harmonizes beautifully the corporeal and the technological.



Interview and text by Eva Roche



ホリスティックな知覚体験の創造:梅田宏明 アーティスト・ソート

Composing Holistic Sensations: Artist’s Thoughts by Hiroaki Umeda


1. Creative Principles  |  創作原理

世界のすべてはバーチャルであり得ると梅田宏明は話す。人の目が受信する光の信号は、脳に伝達され、情報処理され、言語認識に至るわけだが、そのプロセスのどの段階を切断しても、リアリティとして指し示せるオブジェクトはあたりまえだが存在しない。人は複数の情報信号を集めては、ある個人、ある物体、ある風景としてそれを認識しているわけだが、その情報の集合体に恣意的に実体を与えているのは、梅田によれば、じつは「人間の信念」でしかない。「人は自分が事実であると信じたいものをリアリティと名づけ、その信念が少しでも崩れればバーチャリティと変名する」。けれどリアルもバーチャルも、視覚的に分解すればすべて光の粒子でしかない。

東京のような大都市では、社会も情報も高速度で流れゆく。またその絶えざる変化に合わせて、価値観も容赦なく変容する。そのような流動化社会で育った梅田が信念の基盤として依拠したのが、言語でも、歴史でもなく、身体であったのは必然といえるだろう。梅田にとって身体とは「言語以前の言語、感情以前の感情が潜伏する場所」だ。言い換えるならここには、社会に適応した利便的な言語や感情の型に剪定されてしまうよりもまえの「原記号」が存在する。梅田は、このプリミティブかつ複雑な身体感覚をありものの言葉で簡易処理せずに、たびかさなる留保を重ねながら、精度高く観察し論理化ていく。そしてこの言語以前のなにか、感情以前のなにかを「衝動 (impulse)」と呼び、それを創作の原点に置く。

「衝動」は、創作の原点であるとともに目的でもある。梅田は、光・音・映像・身体など舞台上の異なる刺激物を、自分のなかにストックされた多彩な身体感覚に則して極めてロジカルに記譜していくことで、作品を介して、この衝動を観客とシェアしようと試みる。「観客に未知の身体感覚を与えたい」と作家は言う。つまり社会のなかで否応なく萎縮してしまった観客の感覚レセプターを、舞台上のエクストリームな刺激によって一時的に解放し「エモーション(感情)以前のセンセーション(五感)」を覚醒してみせるのだ。梅田にとっては、このような審美的体験こそが芸術の持つ社会的効力である。つまり言語化できぬほど強烈なセンセーションを身体を介して体験することによって、人はまだ見ぬ社会の姿に希望を抱き、未来を変える原動力を育むのだ。

前述したように、梅田によれば、世界のすべては細分化していけば光の粒子でしかない。あるいは、原子や陽子でしかない。そしてこのミクロな視座をそっくりそのままマクロな思考に反転させると、人も物質も自然も、あらゆるものは等価なマテリアルとして地球上で繋がっているとも捉えられる。つまり梅田の発想では「人間は、石や蟻や鳥となんら変わらないただの物質の集合体」でしかない。なぜなら人を人たらしめているとされる、命や心や精神といったものは、やはり物的なオブジェクトとして確たる存在を持たないからだ。さらにいえば、あるとき鳥の群れがひとつの固体として認識できる瞬間があるように「人の固体としての境界線がどこにあるのかも定かでない」。そうなると、ある個人が、他の物質や生物の優位に立つ存在だと認識するのは不自然だ。そうではなく、人と物とは等価であり、固体と全体の境界は曖昧であるという発想を広げていくほうが、あらゆるものが地続きに繋がった「奢りのない世界」が見えてくる。よって梅田の作品では、ダンサーを上位に引き立てるために、他の舞台要素を下位に構成するようなことはなされない。逆にここでは、人は、他の物質や自然物と同じ位相で生きる存在であることが強調される。このいわば「脱人間中心主義」ともいえる梅田の哲学に支えられ、舞台上にはあらゆるものが美しく調和したホリスティック(全体的)な時空間が構築されていく。


2. Dance Method  | ダンス理論

短期間ながらもバレエやヒップホップなど様々なダンススタイルを学んだ経験から、梅田は、あらゆるダンススタイルには「通底する運動原理」があることを認識した。相対的に思考が成熟した二十歳という年齢で本格的にはじめてダンスに触れたことが功を奏し、彼には表面的に異なるダンススタイルが、外見的に異なるファッションスタイルと同様、単に社会通念で色分けされたカテゴリーにしか思えなかったのだ。しかしその異なる装飾物の下には、ダンスとしての飾りをまとうよりも前の身体運動が確実に存在する。そこで梅田は、あらゆる上澄みのスタイルを排除して、その下層にあると思われる「運動原理」を追究し、その原理に基づいて「ムーヴメントのシステム」を構築していくことにした。これが「運動(kinesis)」を基礎言語に置きながら、特定の「スタイル」を超越した「システム」を目指す<ウメダ・メソッド>の基本である。

ウメダ・メソッドの習得は、三段階に分けられる。第一段階は、ニュートラル・ポジションで「立つ」こと。梅田によると、人が美しく立つためには二つの基礎運動原理をマスターする必要がある。あらゆる動きの土台となる「バランスの原理」と、あらゆる動きを生起させる筋肉の「緊張と弛緩の原理」だ。またウメダ・メソッドでは、バランスは三つのグラヴィティ・ポイントを制御することで成立する。腰の重心、胸の重心、足裏の力点だ。梅田は「この三点を完全に制御できれば、人が可能なすべてのスタンディングポジションは取ることができる」と断言する。なおニュートラル・ポジションとは、「足裏、腰、胸表面のそれぞれの中心部を、一本の軸上に重ねた状態」を言う。この軸が完全に体得できるようになると、おのずと次の緊張と弛緩の原理が把握できるようになる。つまり人体として最も自然なバランスが取れるようになることで、身体のあらゆる部位から不要な緊張が抜けていく。そして、最小限の動力で、最大可動域のムーヴメントを生成できるようになるのだ。

第二段階は、ナチュラル・フォースと調和して「動く」こと。ウメダ・メソッドでは、重力、遠心力、反撥力といった自然界に存在するフォースに身体を調和させることから動きが生まれる。つまり人が環境を制御しようと能動的に働きかけるのではなく、環境にあるフォースを利用して受動的に動くのだ。「ブランコを想像すると分かりやすい」と梅田は言う。「ブランコは支点がしっかりしているから、腰掛け部分である動点に最小限の力を加えるだけで、美しい軌道が生まれる」。この極めて力学的な原理に示されるように、第一段階のニュートラル・ポジションを習得しておくことにより、ダンサーは重力などのナチュラル・フォースを物理的に美しく身体に通すことができるようになる。

第三段階は、それらナチュラル・フォースを応用した「流れ」を作ること。ウメダ・メソッドでは、クラシック・バレエのように人間の意志で重力を制御した「ポーズ(停止)」を見せるのではなく、自然と調和した「フロー(流れ)」を生み出すことが優先される。そして不必要なノイズ(緊張、自意識)が入らない美しいフローを作るためには、人が司る「意識のリミッター」をいったん外す必要がある。「人体はこう動くものだ、という偏見を抜くこと」が重要だと梅田は言う。そして周囲にある自然のフォースを精度高く感知し、そのフォースに受動的に身を任せることで動きの流れを作っていく。このような人体への偏見を排除した方法論から、一見「インヒューマン(非人間的)」にも思われる梅田のムーヴメントは生成されていくのだ。


3. Choreographic Project ‘Superkinesis’ | 振付プロジェクト’Superkinesis’

生物学に「超個体 (Superorganism)」という概念がある。これは多数の昆虫や動物などが集まり、蟻のコロニーや、鳥の群れなど、あたかも一つの固体のようにふるまう生物の集団を指す。梅田はこの概念にインスピレーションを受け、2009年、10年間に及ぶ振付プロジェクトである<Superkinesis>を始動した。Superkinesis (超運動)ではその名のとおり「身体だけでなく、光、音、映像などあらゆる運動体を超越的に組織化することにより、ひとつの巨大な生命体のような舞台空間を作る」ことを目指す。つまり梅田にとっては、舞台上のすべての「動き」が振付けの対象なのだ。

身体のみならず、空間のすべてを支える動きを振り付けたいと思うにはわけがある。梅田の考えでは、身体は空間の一部であり、人は自然環境の一部だからだ。より詳しく説くなら、作家のなかにはいわゆる人工美と自然美という二項対立が存在しない。そうではなく、あらゆる人工美は自然の産物だと捉えている。この思考を演繹するなら、梅田にとっては人という高度に文明化した生きものさえも一つの自然物である。よってダンスにおいても人は、自分の能動的な力だけで「身体という環境」を支配下に置こうとするのではなく、受動的に自然と対話する方法を探るべきだと梅田は言う。「例えば猫のような動物が、身のまわりの自然環境と調和することで極めて機能的でかっこいい振るまいを習得しているように、人も環境に身を委ねれば、人本来が持つ人らしい美しい動きが生まれてくるはずだ」。つまり梅田の考えによれば、人の動きの発生は自然によって促され、人の動きに先立って環境が存在するのだ。こうしたホリスティックな哲学に起因して、おのずと梅田は自身の振付プロジェクトにおいて、身体のみならず空間のすべてを振り付ける試みにでたわけだ。

具体的に本振付プロジェクトは、三期の実験段階に区分される。第一期は「動き」の開発。コンテンポラリー・ダンサー、ヒップホップ・ダンサー、バレエ・ダンサーといった異なる身体を保持する踊り手にウメダ・メソッドを適応させた際に派生するであろう多様な動きのボキャブラリーを探求していく。第二期は「システム」の開発。複数人のダンサーが舞台上に立ったとき、それら異なる身体が同一空間で共有可能な全体性をリサーチしていく。この全体性を生みだす要素には、呼吸、リズム、動きの速度、動きの部位の統一などが例としてあげられる。つまりこの段階では、複数人のダンサーで共有できる「時間」を振り付けることが重視される。第三期は「秩序」の開発。前段階までのリサーチで既にあるシステムを共有した複数人のダンサーたちに、さらに光、音、映像などの振付マテリアルを重ねた際に生まれてくるであろう空間全体の秩序を解明していく。

なお、便宜上、リサーチは三段階に分けられているものの、動き、システム、空間秩序の開発は、少なからずすべてのフェーズにまたがり行われている。舞台上のすべての動き――物的変化・時間変化・空間変化――を、振り付けることによりひとつの大きな秩序を誕生させようとする本プロジェクトは、2014年2月現在、第二期まで進行している。


4.Technology and Visual Installations | テクノロジーとインスタレーション

あらゆる「動き」は等価な振付要素である。ならば身体以外の動きのみで構成される振付作品があっていいはずだ。既存の芸術分野に束縛されないこうした自由な発想から、梅田は、2010年頃からビジュアル・インスタレーションを創作しはじめる。

言語以前の言語、感情以前の感情である「衝動(impulse)」を観客に体感させることが作家の目的であるならば、なにもそこに身体メディアが介在する必要はない。もちろん、身体と身体がコンフロントすることで観客が受信する情報量の多様さは、パフォーミング・アートならではの豊かさであり、梅田もその豊かな可能性を信じている。しかし逆に、舞台芸術の表現としてのデメリットもある。例えばダンス作品を鑑賞する際、観客は舞台上にある無数の光の粒子を統合し、それを人の動きとして認識し、その動きをある概念として脳内でまとめようと試みる。つまり梅田の言葉を借りるなら、舞台作品は鑑賞形態として極めて「言語認識に近いまどろっこしいプロセス」を踏むのだ。しかしインスタレーションではこの煩わしい鑑賞プロセスを省略できる。インスタレーションでは「光を光、音を音として、その刺激を観客の身体にダイレクトに与えられる」のだ。この直接性を有効利用するために、梅田の創作するインスタレーションは、観客の視覚を混乱させ、聴覚の限界を冒し、平衡感覚を揺るがすような、脳で解釈する時間的猶予が与えられないほど身体に直に響く作品が多い。今後は触覚などほかの感覚器官を利用した創作にも挑戦したいという。

テクノロジー・アートとコンテンポラリー・ダンスを融合してみせた作家として、梅田宏明を認識する人は多いだろう。そして、それは間違いではない。しかし作家本人によると、自作でテクノロジーを利用することは決して必須条件ではないという。また、いわゆる最先端のテクノロジーを利用しているわけでもないという。ではなぜ梅田の作品からは、他のダンス作品ではあまり見られない、デジタル・テクノロジーにアップ・トゥ・デートな感覚が与えられるのか。梅田の説明によればそれは「思考が、テクノロジーの進歩に合わせて刷新されているから」だという。

梅田によると、新たなテクノロジーがいくら生まれても、旧式のリアルの「再現」にそれを用いていては意味がない。例えば最先端の音響機器を用いてクラシック音楽をいかに本物そっくりに「再現」するか、といったことには梅田はあまり興味を示さない。そうではなく、もし今までにない音響機器が誕生したとするならば、その機器でしか「実現」(再現ではなく)できない音の可能性を追求する。あるいはその機器でしか実現できない解像度の世界を探求する。つまり梅田の考えでは、質実ともにテクノロジーにアップ・トゥ・デートな作品を創造するためには、なによりも作家本人の思考を最先端の技術に合わせて刷新することが求められる。テクノロジー・アートの豊かな未来は、テクノロジーそのものの革新以上に、テクノロジーが提示してくれる方法論に合わせて作家の思考がアップデートされていくことにあるからだ。だからこそあくまでも梅田の場合は、テクノロジーに先行して目指すべき明快な世界感があり、それを実現するために必要最低限のデジタル・テクノロジーのみを利用していく。

なお梅田のダンス作品では、主に二つの理由でデジタル・テクノロジーが採用されることが多い。第一には、「世界の解像度を上げる」ため。例えばデジタル技術を用いると、空間的に1ピクセルの細やかさまで解像度を上げて構成することができる。また時間的にも人の可聴領域を越える精度まで音の伸縮を制御することができる。「その精密に構成された時空間でのみ実現可能な審美性があるはず」と梅田は語る。第二には、「身体認識のスケールを拡張/縮小させる」ため。例えば舞台上の身体の動きをセンサーで取得し、それをリアルタイムに後方のスクリーンに投影すれば、自分の身体ひとつで司れるスペースが拡張した感覚を抱くことができる。また精密機械でしか描けないような細やかなラインを舞台上の身体がまとうとしたら、身体認識のスケールがミクロな方向に縮小していく。「デジタル・テクノロジーの誕生によって、身体の感覚が変容している」と梅田は言う。そして、その変容を既知のヒューマンな身体概念にそぐわないものとして拒絶するのではなく、それこそが現在進行形のヒューマンな身体だと受容し、分析し、論理化することにより、梅田は最先端のテクノロジーと美しく調和した芸術作品を創造していく。


Interview and text by Eva Roche





 

Contact



S20 / Hiroaki Umeda
email: contact(at)hiroakiumeda.com
website: http://hiroakiumeda.com
tel: +81(0) 50 5534 7346

 

History

Choreography

3. isolation

2012
Tanzhaus, Düsseldorf, Germany
Tanzquartier, Vienna, Austria

2011
Tanz im August, Hebbel am Ufer, Berlin, Germany

 

2. repulsion

2011
Festival EXIT, MAC, Créteil, France
Tanzquartier, Vienna, Austria
Julidans, Amsterdam, Holland
anz im August, Berlin, Hebbel am Ufer, Germany
Noorderzon festival, Groningen,The Netherlands
Théâtre du Beauvaisis, Beauvais, France
Le Prisme, Élancourt, France

2010
Théâtre Jean Vilar, Suresnes, France
Maison de la Musique, Nanterre, France
PACT Zollverein, Essen, Germany
Theatre National de Bretagne, Rennes, France
Theatre Pole Sud, Strasbourg, France

 

1. centrifugal

2010
Maison de la culture du Japon à Paris, Paris, France

2009
Full Moon Dance Festival, Pyhäjärvi, Finland
Red Brick Warehouse, Yokohama, Japan

 

Solo

Holistic Strata

2011
YCAM, Yamaguchi, Japan
Festival EXIT, MAC, Créteil, France
Festival VIA, Maubeuge, France
Art Rock, Saint-Brieuc, France
Julidans, Amsterdam, Holland
Noorderzon festival, Groningen, The Netherlands
Todaysart Festival, Den Haag, The Netherlands
Todaysart Festival, Brussels, Belgium
Festival de Danse de Cannes, Cannes, France
Centre des Arts, Enghien, France

 

Haptic

2011
De Warande, Turnhout, Belgique
Cultuurcentrum, Hasselt, Belgique
Dublin Dance Festival, Dublin, Ireland
Toneelschuur, Haarlem, The Netherlands
Théâtre du Beauvaisis, Beauvais, France
Le Prisme, Élancourt, France
Centre des Arts, Enghien, France

2010
The Tramway, Glasgow, UK
ESAM, Caen, France
Theatre de Bourg-en-Bresse, Bourg-en-Bresse, France
Aichi Triennale, Aichi, Japan
Pecs International Dance Festival, Pecs, Hungry
Alhondlga Bilbao Cultural Centre Venue, Bilbao, Spain
Melbourne International Arts Festival, Melbourne, Australia
Maison de la culture du Japon à Paris, Paris, France
Theatre Pole Sud, Strasbourg, France
Maison de la Musique, Nanterre, France
Theatre National de Bretagne, Rennes, France

2009
Charleroi Danse, Brussels, Belgium
Verkadefabriek, Den Bosch, The Netherlands
La Bâtie, Festival de Genève, Geneva, Switzerland
Théatre de Nimes, Nimes, France
Red Brick Warehouse, Yokohama, Japan
Spring Dance, Utrecht, Holland
Spoleto Festival, Spoleta, USA

2008
Festival d’Automne, MAC, Créteil, France

 

Adapting for Distortion

2011
De Warande, Turnhout, Belgique
Cultuurcentrum, Hasselt, Belgique
Dublin Dance Festival, Dublin, Ireland
Toneelschuur, Haarlem, The Netherlands
Scopitone, Nantes, France
Kulturzentrum Tempel, Karlsruhe, Germany

2010
Club Transmediale, Berlin, Germany
The Tramway, Glasgow, UK
Theatre d’Arras, Arras, France
Theatre de l’Archipel, Perpignan, France
ESAM, Caen, France
Theatre de Bourg-en-Bresse, Bourg-en-Bresse, France
Aichi Triennale, Aichi, Japan
DANS PLATFORM İSTANBUL, Istanbul, Turkey
Alhondlga Bilbao Cultural Centre Venue, Bilbao, Spain
Melbourne International Arts Festival, Melbourne, Australia
Maison de la Musique, Nanterre, France
Theatre National de Bretagne, Rennes, France

2009
Charleroi Danse, Brussels, Belgium
Todays’ Art Festival, Den Haag, The Netherlands
La Bâtie, Festival de Genève, Geneva, Switzerland
Théâtre des Salins, Martigues, France
Théatre de Nimes, Nimes, France
Spring Dance, Utrecht, The Netherlands
Japan Society NY, New York, USA
Festival Chiassodanza, Chiasso, Switzerland

2008
Festival Roma Europa, Rome, Italy
Festival d’Automne, MAC, Créteil, France

 

Accumulated Layout

2011
YCAM, Yamaguchi, Japan
L’Avant-Scène, Cognac, France
Scopitone, Nantes, France

2010
Theatre d’Arras, Arras, France
Theatre de l’Archipel, Perpignan, France
Salle Georges Brassens, Boulogne, Boulogne sur Mer, France
PACT Zollverein, Essen, Germany

2009
National Chiang Kai-Shek Cultural Center, R.O.C., Taipei, Taiwan
Tanzquartier, Vienna, Austria Sydney Opera House, Sydney, Australia
HPAC Theater Hall, Hyogo, Japan
Théâtre des Salins, Martigues, France
The Dance Centre, Vancouver, Canada
Festival Antipodes, Morlaix, France
Cultuurcentrum Brugge, Brugge, Belgium
Théâtre A Châtillon, Chatillon, France
Biennale Val de Marne, Villejuif, France
Hippodrome Scène nationale, Douai, France
Japan Society NY, New York, USA
Toneelschuur Haarlem, Haarlem, The Netherlands
De Warande, Turnhout, Belgium
Theater aan het Vrijthof, Maastricht, The Netherlands
Schouwburg, Arnhem, The Netherlands
Parktheater, Eindhoven, The Netherlands
Melkweg Theater, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Cultuurcentrum, Hasselt, The Netherlands
Goudse Schouwburg, GoudaThe Netherlands
De Tamboer, Hoogeveen, The Netherlands
Stadsschouwburg, Groningen, The Netherlands
Kortrijkse Schouwburg, Kortrijk, The Netherlands
Rotterdamse Schouwburg, Rotterdam, The Netherlands

2008
Le Fanal, Scène Nationale, Saint-Nazaire, France
New National Theater, Tokyo, Japan
La Bâtie, Festival de Genève, Geneva, Switzerland
Tanz im August, Berlin, Germany
Full Moon Dance Festival, Pyhäjärvi, Finland
Festival Julidans, Amsterdam, Nederlands
Grec Festival, Barcelona, Spain
Dance Week Festival, Zagreb, Croatia
ArtRock Festival, St.Brieuc, France
Festival Bo:m., Art Theater, Seoul, Korea

2008
New Territories, Glasgow, UK
La Ferme du Buisson, (Hors Saison, Arcadi), France

2007
Teatro Palladium, Romaeuropa Festival, Rome, Italy
MeetingPoints5, HAU ZWEI, Berlin, Germany
Theatre de Nimes, Nimes, France
MeetingPoints5, Ness El fen – Hall, Tunis, Tunisia
MeetingPoints5, Al Madina Theatre, Beirut, Lebanon
MeetingPoints5, Rawabet Theatre, Cairo, Egypt
Centre des Arts, Enghien, France
Actoral.6, Marseille, France
Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, USA
Festival Esterni, Terni, Italy
Maison de la danse, Lyon, France
Kunsten FESTIVAL des Arts, Brussels, Belgium
Théâtre national de Chaillot, Paris, France
NoorderZon ’07, Groningen, Holland
MLADI LEVI 2007, Ljubljana, Slovenia

 

while going to a condition

2011
Tanzquartier, Vienna, Austria

2010
The Blue Coat, Liverpool, UK
Maison de la Musique, Nanterre, France

2009
Festival Les Derniers Hommes, Dijon, France
National Chiang Kai-Shek Cultural Center, R.O.C., Taipei, Taiwan
Verkadefabriek, Den Bosch, The Netherlands
Sydney Opera House, Sydney, Australia
HPAC Theater Hall, Hyogo, Japan
garajistanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
Tanzhaus, Dusseldorf, Germany
The Dance Centre, Vancouver, Canada
Antipodes 2009, Morlaix, France
Cultuurcentrum Brugge, Brugge, Belgium
Théâtre A Châtillon, Chatillon, France
Ten Days on the Island, Hobart, Australia
Biennale Val de Marne, Villejuif, France
Spoleto Festival, Spoleta, USA
Festival Chiassodanza, Chiasso, Swiss
Toneelschuur Haarlem, Haarlem, The Netherlands
De Warande, Turnhout, Belgium
Theater aan het Vrijthof, Maastricht, The Netherlands
Schouwburg, Arnhem, The Netherlands
Parktheater, Eindhoven, The Netherlands
Melkweg Theater, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Cultuurcentrum, Hasselt, The Netherlands
Goudse Schouwburg, Gouda, The Netherlands
De Tamboer, Hoogeveen, The Netherlands
Stadsschouwburg, Groningen, The Netherlands
Kortrijkse Schouwburg, Kortrijk, The Netherlands
Rotterdamse Schouwburg, Rotterdam, The Netherlands

2008
Festival Roma Europa, Rome, Italy
“Croisement” at Espace Michel Simon, Noisy-le-grand, France
Théâtre Louis Aragon, Tremblay, France
CAMERA JAPAN, Rotterdam, Nederlands
La Bâtie, Festival de Genève, Geneva, Switzerland
Festival Julidans, Amsterdam, Nederlands
Grec Festival, Barcelona, Spain
Festival Bo:m., Art Theater, Seoul, Korea
Plaza Futura, Eindhoven, The Netherlands
London Mime Festival, Barbican Center, London, UK
New Territories 2008, Glasow, UK
La ferme du buisson (Hors Saison, Arcadi), France
Dance Week Festival, Zagreb, Croatia

2007
Arcachon Expansion, Arcachon, France
Le Carré des Jalles, St. Medard, France
MeetingPoints5, HAU ZWEI, Berlin, Germany
El Mediator, Perpignan, France
Theatre de Nimes, Nimes, France
MeetingPoints5, Ness El fen – Hall, Tunis, Tunisia
MeetingPoints5, Al Madina Theatre, Beirut, Lebanon
MeetingPoints5, Rawabet Theatre, Cairo, Egypt
CULTURGEST, Lisboa, Portugal
Bilbao – Festival B.A.D., in La FuNdiciÓn, Bilbao, Spain
Museo ARTIUM, Vitoria, Spain
Festival de Otoño, Madrid, Spain
Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, USA
Festival Esterni, Terni, Italy
TorinoDanza, Torino, Italy
Maison de la danse, Lyon, France
Kunsten Festival des Arts, Brussels, Belgium
VideoDance 2007, Athens, Greece
Théâtre national de Chaillot, Paris, France
IDN, Barcelona, Spain
VIA Festival 2007, Maubeuge, France
Sziget Festival 2007, Budapest, Hungary
MLADI LEVI 2007, Ljubljana, Slovenia

2006
Moving in November, Helsinki, Finland
MES DE DANZA, Seville, Spain
CADIZ EN DANZA, Cadiz, Spain
Art Rock festival, Saint-Brieuc, France
En Pé de Pedra, Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Printemps de la danse, Angouleme, France
La Chaufferie, Saint-Denis, France

2005
Biennale nationale de danse du Val-de-Marne, Paris, France
Contemporanea festival, Prato, Italy
Dance Theater Workshop, NY, US

2004
ILE DANSE FESTIVAL, Corsica, France
Teatro Arsenale, uovo, Milan, Italy

Les Plateaux de la Biennale, Paris, France
Les Floraisons du Botanique, Brussels, Belgium
FIVU 04, Montevideo, Uruguay
Surdepierto, Buenos Aires, Argentine
Danzalborde Dance Festival, Valparaiso, Chile
Panorama Dance Festival, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil
SESC Pompeia, Sao Paulo, Brasil

2003
Aka Renga Sohko, Yokohama Dance Collection, Yokohama, Japan
Agora de la danse, Nouvelle dance festival, Montreal, Canada
dietheater, Wien, Austria
4 + 4 days in motion, Prague, Czech

2002
Landmark Hall, Yokohama Dance Collection, Yokohama, Japan
MC93, Rencontres Chorégraphiques Internationals, Paris, France
Monty Theater, Junge Hunde festival, Antwerp, Belgium
Le lie unique, Oriental extreme, Nantes, France

 

Duo

2010
Pecs International Dance Festival, Pecs, Hungry
The Blue Coat, Liverpool, UK

2009
Festival Les Derniers Hommes, Dijon, France
garajistanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
Ten Days on the Island, Hobart, Australia

2008
Festival Scopitone, Nantes, France
CAMERA JAPAN, Rotterdam, Nederlands
Tanz im August, Berlin, Germany
Full Moon Dance Festival, Pyhäjärvi, Finland
Les Spectacles Vivants – Centre Pompidou, Paris, France
Plaza Futura, Eindhoven, The Netherlands
London International Mime Festival, Barbican Center, London, UK

2007
Maison de la culture du Japon, Paris, France
Le Carré des Jalles, St. Medard, France
El Mediator, Perpignan, France
Bilbao – Festival B.A.D., in La FuNdiciÓn, Bilbao, Spain
Museo ARTIUM, Vitoria, Spain
Festival de Otoño, Madrid, Spain
Actoral.6, Marseille, France
CONTEMPORANEA 07, Prato, Italy
VIA Festival 2007, Maubeuge, France
NoorderZon ’07, Groningen, Holland

2006
La Chaufferie, Saint-Denis, France
Kichijoji Theater, Tokyo, Japan

2004
Panorama dance festival, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil SESC Pompeia, Sao Paulo, Brazil

 

Finore

2008
VIA Festival 2008, Maubeuge, France

2007
CULTURGEST, Lisboa, Portugal

2005
Biennale nationale de danse du Val-de-Marne, Paris, France
Les Plateaux de la Biennale, Paris, France

2004
Les Floraisons du Botanique, Brussels, Belgium

2003
Agora de la danse, Nouvelle dance festival, Montreal, Canada

 

Other

2012
Dance and audio workshop, Joint Adventures Munich, Germany

2011
Videodance workshop, Atelier de Paris-Carolyn Carlson, Paris, France

2010
workshop, Spring dance festival, Utrecht, Holland
Performance in the installation by Hiroshi Naito at MOMAT, Tokyo, Japan

2009
Atelier de Paris-Carolyn Carlson, Paris, France
Installations, Tanzquartier, Vienna, Austria

2008
Choreography for Finnish dancers at Zodiak, Helsinki, Finland
Site-Specific Performance, Festival Mellemrum, Copenhagen, Denmark
Outside Performance, Interplay08, Torino, Italy

2007
Collaboration with Kinkaleri, Tokyo, Japan

2006
Choreography for “The Paper Nautilus”, the project of Theatre Cryptic

2005
Performance in “FUNKA”, which was organized by “BANETO”, Tokyo, Japan

2004
Peformance with Singo2, DJ A-1 and Hiraku Suzuki in Tokyo Style in Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden Performance in Takehito Koganezawa’s exhibition, with Robert Lippok(TO ROCOCO ROT) and Jun Shibata
Performance in live of Tetsuo Furudate and KASPER T.TOEPLITZ Performance with SUGI(percussion)

2002
Collaborating with Toshimaru Nakamura Austria-Japan Project, Aka Renga Sohko, Yokohama, Japan

 

 

Installation

 

split flow installation

2012
Gallery Azamino, Kanagawa, Japan

2011
Glow, Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven

 

Holistic Strata installation

2011
Festival EXIT, MAC, Créteil, France
Gare de Lille, Lille, France
Espace Sculfort, Maubeuge, France

 

Haptic installation

2011
Festival EXIT, MAC, Créteil, France
Gare de Lille, Lille, France
Espace Sculfort, Maubeuge, France
Scopitone, Nantes, France

2010
Aichi Triennale, Aichi, Japan